Wideband Audio For Business Phone Guide

Wideband Audio For Business Phone Guide

Your team will not be able to work successfully with colleagues or clients unless they can clearly hear each other talking. High quality sound is a critical part of any productive workplace telephone system. Wideband audio solutions for a range of phones and handsets are available for many office environments.
Enterprise-grade phone systems for businesses of all sizes minimize background noise pollution in the busiest office settings so that workers will interact more effectively. Wideband / HD audio solutions for mobile phones, conference communications and contact center employees can improve productivity.

What Is Wideband Audio?

Often called HD Voice, wideband audio is high-definition telephony sound quality over standard optical telecommunications. It increases the frequency spectrum of audio signals transmitted over telephone lines, resulting in better voice efficiency. Human speech frequency ranges from 14 KHz to 80 Hz, but narrowband, voiceband, or normal phone calls decrease frequencies from 300 Hz to 3.4 kHz. The bandwidth limit is relaxed by wideband audio transmitting the audio frequency spectrum from 50 Hz to 22 kHz; however, some wideband codecs may use a higher 16-bit audio bit depth to encode sounds, resulting in a much improved voice quality too.

What Is Wideband Audio

Wideband Audio Requirements

Calls initiated via wideband audio require high-definition communication across the entire contact chain, otherwise calling back to normal narrowband audio is returned. Wideband audio has a frequency spectrum of 50 Hz to 7 kHz compared to narrowband audio, which restricts audio frequencies to 300 Hz to 3.4 kHz and does not meet bandwidth restrictions.


Wideband also uses g.722 codec and its variants to capture audio samples at 16 kHz per second. In comparison, the g.711 codec and an 8 kHz sampling rate are used in the narrowband recording; this high-quality codec enables devices to relay deeper and better speech tones and collect information. The resulting algorithmic delay is calculated to be 0.125 milliseconds (ms) if a call has to revert from high definition to narrowband as a system does not permit wideband in the chain. 

Unlike conventional sound-band or narrowband phone calls restricted to audio frequencies, HD language is a common charging feature for digital telephony. HD voice, the audio signal received over a telephone line, can be applied to a broader frequency range, leading to higher voice quality. Calls initiated via wideband audio require high-definition communication across the entire contact chain, otherwise calling back to normal narrowband audio is returned. Wideband audio has a frequency spectrum of 50 Hz to 7 kHz compared to narrowband audio, which restricts audio frequencies to 300 Hz to 3.4 kHz and does not meet bandwidth restrictions.


Wideband also uses g.722 codec and its variants to capture audio samples at 16 kHz per second. In comparison, the g.711 codec and an 8 kHz sampling rate are used in the narrowband recording, this high-quality codec enables devices to relay deeper and better speech tones and collect information. The resulting algorithmic delay is calculated to be 0.125 milliseconds (ms) if a call has to revert from high definition to narrowband as a system does not permit wideband in the chain.

Unlike conventional sound-band or narrowband phone calls restricted to audio frequencies, HD language is a common charging feature for digital telephony. HD voice, the audio signal received over a telephone line, can be applied to a broader frequency range, leading to higher voice quality.

How Wideband Audio Works

Essentially, HD voice is wideband audio processing, something that has long been used for telephone calls and VoIP applications. Instead of restricting a call frequency between 300 Hz and 3.4 kHz, a wideband audio call is transmitted at or above 50 Hz to 7 kHz.


That’s more in line with the human voice transmitting audio between 75 Hz and 14 kHz. HD voice often needs more samples per second than a normal call. HD voice calls up to 16,000 instead of 8,000 audio samples per second.


During a call, you can hear more detail in a person’s speech. It’s not especially modern technology. You may have encountered HD Voice by using an app like Skype that supports such higher frequencies with its own audio codec, or on a phone call.

From narrowband to wideband audio

For over 100 years, telephones have used a small frequency range from 300 hertz to 3.4 kilohertz. While the bandwidth of human voice frequency varies from about 50 Hertz to 8 Kilohertz, it remains highly intelligible when expressed at extreme bandwidth speech. Implementation of emerging telecommunications technologies like ISDN did not change the bandwidth limit.
While ISDN has two parallel digital voice channels, both channels’ analog bandwidth remains just 300 Hz to 3.4 kHz.
The implementation of high communication capacities for Voice-over-IP telephony (VoIP telephony) and IP networks and IP lines allows higher frequency spectrum for calls. Wideband audio ranges from 50 to 7,000 Hertz. It helps relay deeper and higher talk tones over the phone line.

From narrowband to wideband audio

Wideband audio for Enhanced Communication

Need wideband audio technology to improve connectivity and increase workplace productivity? We offer a wide range of mobile and desktop communication devices at BTelecoms that feature wideband audio / HD voice technology to improve your business and private communication processes. To get more details, contact us today.

Wideband Audio Features

In the last decade, the development of a wide range of applications has facilitated the use of wideband audio as a means of communication in the area of body-centred communication. Communication wideband potentially offers a number of benefits, such as increased tolerance by raising spectral power densities. 

The advantages of body-centred communication are also particularly attractive, with the potential for fast, cost-effective, and low latency communication. The received signals are similar in form but vary in limited ranges and can be collected over a broad range of wavelengths such as light, infrared and radio waves.

Enhanced monopole antenna

A band notch is required to avoid interference with other existing communication systems, which can be achieved with a proposed butterfly antenna-shaped monopole antenna with cut-out radiator slits. 

The antenna can emit both radiation and receive pulses simultaneously, making pulse-based UWB radio communication a viable alternative to conventional wireless communication. Future research in this field might include developing a more efficient antenna design with less signal interference and a wider range of wavelengths. 

To avoid surpluses, it is possible to pass only the intended signal through the monopoly antenna without interference between it and the other signals. 

The IC R8600 has a market for mobile broadband receivers-first, it uses a high-performance antenna, low latency, high bandwidth, a multi-channel antenna for demodulation, decoding and most signal processing. 

Multiple Frequencies

The technology allows the use of multiple frequencies with different characteristics and opens the door to communications systems that can offer high-performance capabilities, such as radar systems that can use multiple frequencies.

Multiple Channels

The technology also allows transmitters to handle multiple channels, and it can be used for measuring instruments where performance at higher frequencies is inadequate, for example when the frequency range of a radar system is measured with a single antenna or radio transmitter, or when the amplifier is used in a broadband communication or radar network.

Wideband/HD Voice

In contrast to traditional voice-band or narrowband telephony which is limited in audio bandwidth, HD language is a standard, chargeable quality for digital telephony. HD voice extends the transmitted audio signal over telephone lines, resulting in higher voice quality, while regular “voiceband” or “narrowband” calls limit the audio frequencies. 

HD voice expands the transmitted audio signal over telephone lines, resulting in higher voice quality, while conventional “voiceband” or “narrowband” calls restrict the audio frequencies. Like conventional voice or narrowband telephones, which are restricted in audio bandwidth, HD voice for digital telephony is a standard, chargeable service. It provides mobile phones and tablets with an optimized, high-quality voice and text communication solution. 

However, broadband codecs can be used to encode and sample, which also leads to significantly improved voice quality and lower latencies. 

It provides an integrated, high-quality, low latency, multi-channel voice interface with a broad range of features and functions.

Wideband-HD Voice

Benefits of Wideband Audio

When the capacity of a caller to provide a high-speed Internet connection is that, retailers and businesses are increasingly accepting wideband codecs for HD audio to improve speech quality. 

The benefits of wideband audio are as follows:

  • Improves the intelligibility of the natural sound and voice. 
  • Minimizes the hassle of responding to calls in small quarters. 
  • Provides an optimal solution for telephone calls or cases where many people are speaking at once.
  • Reduces error counting 

FAQ

Also called HD voice wideband audio is a sound quality of high definition for telephony speech. It increases the frequency of audio transmitted through telephone lines and leads to increased voice quality, compared to the standard toll-level optical telecommunications.

The term bandwidth is used to identify the range of frequencies used in telephonic communications channels. The scale of the band is normally in khez, MHz, or GHz. The broadband audio–HD voice quality provides a higher level of crystal-clear audio and can connect to several devices.

HD voice calls greatly enhance the perception of the natural sound and expression. Hearing what the other person does is far more effective both in noisy environments and in quiet conversations. Practically the whole continuum allows better speech recognition and eventual detection of individuals.

Calls initiated via wideband audio require high definition communication over the contact chain and otherwise a standard narrowband audio is reversed. Wideband audio has a frequency spectrum of 50 Hz to 7 kHz compared to a narrowband audio which restricts audio frequencies to 300 Hz and 3,4 kHz.